CT of the thorax

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Author: Mikael Häggström [notes 1]

Normal anatomy

High-resolution computed tomographs of a normal thorax, taken in the axial, coronal and sagittal planes, respectively.

Angiography

CT angiography of the thorax is a contrast CT exam, tailored to the proper contrast phase depending on the level of the suspected condition by the referring clinician:

  • Veins from contrast infusion
  • Pulmonary veins

Basic screening

  • Lung parenchyma: Scan for opacities, preferably at a maximum intensity projection of about 8 mm in order to detect any lung nodules.[1]
  • Pleura, for any fluid in the dorsal parts
  • Skeleton: Any signs of damage.
  • Lymph nodes in mediastinal, hilar and axial areas. If possibly enlarged, see CT of thoracic lymphadenopathy
  • Visible abdominal volumes for any expansions or focal changes in the liver, adrenals or spleen.

Report

Even absence of opacities in the lung.

Diseases

Vascular
Lymph nodes

Pulmonary hypertension

The presence of a dilated main pulmonary artery of 29 mm or more in combination with an artery–to-bronchus diameter ratio of 1:1 or more at segmental level in three or four lobes, confers a specificity of 100% for the presence of pulmonary hypertension.[2]

Notes

  1. For a full list of contributors, see article history. Creators of images are attributed at the image description pages, seen by clicking on the images. See Radlines:Authorship for details.

References

  1. Kawel, Nadine; Seifert, Burkhardt; Luetolf, Marcus; Boehm, Thomas (2009). "Effect of Slab Thickness on the CT Detection of Pulmonary Nodules: Use of Sliding Thin-Slab Maximum Intensity Projection and Volume Rendering ". American Journal of Roentgenology 192 (5): 1324–1329. doi:10.2214/AJR.08.1689. ISSN 0361-803X. 
  2. Peña, Elena; Dennie, Carole; Veinot, John; Muñiz, Susana Hernández (2012). "Pulmonary Hypertension: How the Radiologist Can Help ". RadioGraphics 32 (1): 9–32. doi:10.1148/rg.321105232. ISSN 0271-5333.